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Itasca property crimes attorneyThere are many acts that constitute a criminal offense in the United States. However, not everyone might know that certain actions that can result in an arrest, and they may be unaware of the potential punishments. In Illinois, a property crime is defined as the theft or destruction of another person’s property. Depending on the circumstances, the charges can be classified as a misdemeanor or a felony, with varying penalties if someone is convicted. It is important to note that property is not just limited to a piece of land or a personal possession, such as a house, a vehicle, or expensive artwork. In some cases, intellectual property can be stolen, which refers to inventions, writings and artwork, designs, names, symbols, and images. Essentially, anything of value to the owner can be considered property.  

Examples of Property Crimes

There are many different types of property crimes according to Illinois law. These can include the following acts or behaviors: 

  • Arson

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Itasca criminal defense lawyerThe phrase “violent crimes” can refer to various types of criminal offenses. Under Illinois law, violent crimes involve harm or the threat of harm to another person. One of the most serious of these offenses is homicide. Illinois law distinguishes between the types or “levels” of homicide as follows: first-degree murder, second-degree murder, and involuntary manslaughter/reckless homicide. The main difference between the crimes is the state of mind of the alleged offender at the time of the killing. Generally, this means one act may be intentional or premeditated, while another may be accidental. This key distinction can be very important in building a criminal defense strategy for the defendant. 

First-Degree Murder

First-degree murder is the most serious homicide charge. According to Illinois law, it is defined as intending to kill or do great bodily harm to another person, while knowing that the act would cause death, and without lawful justification. In other words, the perpetrator acted intentionally, and the killing was not committed in self-defense. 

Felony murder refers to a legal doctrine that states that if a defendant commits a forcible felony (such as armed robbery), and that act results in someone’s death, the offender can be charged with first-degree murder as a result of that death.

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DuPage County weapons offensesGun laws vary significantly from state to state. Illinois has some of the strictest gun laws and associated criminal penalties in the country. Illinois residents who violate firearm laws can face heavy fines and years of incarceration as a result. If you or someone you know has been charged with a firearm-related crime, it is crucial that you speak with a qualified criminal defense attorney to learn about your defense options.

Gun Owners Must Obtain a FOID Card

Illinois residents who wish to legally own a firearm or ammunition must obtain a Firearm Owners Identification Card (FOID) from the Illinois State Police. Other than certain individuals who are exempt from this rule, such as members of the Armed Forces, anyone caught owning a firearm without a FOID card can face criminal consequences. Having a firearm in your possession without a FOID card is considered a petty offense in some circumstances and a felony offense in other circumstances.While this might seem like a rather dramatic range, there are many variables that must be taken into account by prosecutors. 

Unlawful Possession of a Firearm

Owning a gun with an expired FOID card that has been expired for six months or less is typically only a petty offense. If you own a gun without a FOID card but you qualify for a FOID card, you can be charged with a Class A misdemeanor unlawful possession of a firearm offense. This crime is punishable by up to one year in jail and fines of up to $2,500. A second or subsequent FOID violation can be considered a Class 4 felony offense punishable by three years’ imprisonment and heavy fines. 

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Can I Get a DUI for Using Prescription Drugs and Driving?Although it is illegal in every state, many people continue to get behind the wheel of a vehicle while impaired by alcohol or drugs. The use of any controlled substances can greatly affect their reflexes and reaction time, which may cause an accident. Car crashes can result in severe injuries or even fatalities. That is why the laws in Illinois are strict when it comes to driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol. A DUI stop can lead to arrest and steep fines, as well as jail time. However, if someone takes prescription medication and operates a vehicle, could that also result in a DUI charge? It is important to know what the law states on this type of legal drug use in Illinois so you can plan a strong criminal defense if you are faced with such charges. 

What Does “Driving Under the Influence” Mean?

The use of legal drugs, including prescription drugs, medical marijuana, and over-the-counter medications, can potentially lead to a DUI arrest and conviction just like a DUI related to alcohol. “Under the influence” is the term used when a driver’s ability to operate a motor vehicle safely was impacted to a significant degree by an alcoholic drink, a drug, or the two combined. That being said, someone can be considered under the influence of legal prescription drugs when driving. A lot of over-the-counter and prescription medicines can negatively impact motor skills, coordination, and alertness, even when the correct dosage is taken. A few of the typical side effects that can impact a person’s ability to drive include:

  • Dizziness;
  • Drowsiness;
  • Nausea;
  • Blurry vision;
  • Delayed movement;
  • Fainting; and
  • Inability to focus 

Various drugs can affect motorists in different ways depending on an individual’s height, weight, age, etc. Those drugs that impair judgment, reaction time, or motor skills are considered just as risky as alcoholic beverages. These side effects can lead to unsafe driving, often resulting in a car crash with injuries or fatalities.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_shutterstock_661207471.jpgIllinois has joined the ranks of states like California and Colorado to legalize adult recreational use of marijuana.  Although the Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act (the “Act”) has been dubbed the most progressive marijuana bill in the country, it is certainly not without limits.  Here is what you need to know about the Act:

Who can buy marijuana?

Anyone 21 years of age or older.

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